Tag Archives: back handspring

But wait! We’re on floor?!

Hi All,

Alright so today’s post is about working beam skills, ON THE FLOOR. This is SO, SO, SO important. If you can’t do it perfectly on the floor (or pretty darn close), the chances of you successfully on the beam are almost none. Also, there are tons and tons and tons of fantastic beam drills you can do on the floor/panel mats if say…all the beams are taken.

This first video is a very nice set up Al Fong posted. It’s a great drill period, but this set up allows it to be done with a larger group which is even better. Getting young kids to have the muscle memory of kicking over the top in cartwheels on the beam (even if it’s a floor beam) is really important.

This second video has a number of drills for front aerials, back handsprings, back walkovers and onodis. All done on the floor. Pick some, add them to your beam (or floor) rotation. See how much they help!

For more drills and exercises to create strong, confident, technically correct beam workers look here:
Building Up Beam: Drills to Build Confidence and Correctness

Train hard!

From the beginning to the end

Hi All,

Back handsprings are one of those skills that gymnasts are going to use throughout their entire career. It follows them from floor and tumbling, to beam series’, to yurchenkos etc. It’s one of those things you really want to get right to begin with, and have to continue to work on all throughout their career.

This first video is of a fairly typical (but very effective) back handspring drill. Teaching kids how to jump, and push through their toes (among other things), by having them back handspring over a panel mat.

This second video is of another fairly typical snap down back handspring drill. Helping gymnasts develop speed and power by doing back handsprings in a series. It’s always fun when they get older/better as well and you can start adding tucks, layouts and fulls to the end of the series. I also appreciate the fact that they have 4” ers down. Protecting kids from early overuse injuries is important.

Train hard!

Back handspring drills

Photo Credit: Erin Costa

Trying new things

Hi All,

Today’s post is about trying new things. My personal belief is the more we expose our gymnasts to the easier it is to teach them new skills. This means starting things early, and it means building in time to your workout to try new things, things that you think maybe wont go into their routines THIS season. And this means on everything. It means trying new jumps on beam, teaching whips or other things in combination on floor etc.

This first video is another good one from Mike Durante. Combination work on tumble track is GREAT. It’s a perfect place to start. Low impact, good fun. Challenge your kids to connect different things, to come up with fun combinations. The awareness will make them better tumblers, and they might be good at some skills you hadn’t thought they would be.

This second video is of combination tumbling using Tumbl Trak’s Air Floor. Which, by the way, is a FANTASTIC product. I absolutely love it. But that’s beside the point. It’s another great place to have your kids play around. Especially going into a pit (if you have access to one). Have them try new things, whips or multiple fronts in a row. Who knows, you might come up with some new passes for the season.

Train hard!

Fun Friday #13

Hi All!

Fun Friday again! YIPPEE! Let’s get to it!

I’m going to let this routine speak for itself. Alright, one comment, AWESOME! Enjoy.

p.s. – I LOVE the choreography. You can tell it was anything but an afterthought.

Second video. When I first saw this video my first reaction was “hehehe, YES, YES, YES.” You don’t see this combination much on beam. I’m a huge proponent of trying new things on every event. Variety is AWESOME. Let your kids play around with combinations. See what they come up with.

Train hard!

Connected?

Hi All,

So today I’m going to talk a little about back handsprings on beam. Or, possibly better, back handspring SERIES on beam. If you’ve been in the gym for any length of time you’re probably very aware of the trouble some kids have connecting their series, and possibly some of the methods coaches use to correct this. I’m a big fan of mixing it up. Back handspring series on the floor, 1 back handspring on the beam connected to another back handspring that goes off the beam to a panel mat, back handsprings off a spring board onto the beam etc. The more I can mix it up, the more confident I think kids get. That being said here are a couple drills you may like.

I LOVE this drill. I think it gives kids a lot of confidence, it often fixes bent knees and it feels a little more like what they will experience coming out of their first skill. Notice that her arms are up the entire time. Let me note, this is another one of those you may want to spot first. Kids don’t understand the feeling at first and I’ve seen a lot of arms buckling, could land on head type situations from this kind of thing if you don’t spot the first few.

This second one is the same as the first but put on the beam. I think it gives kids a more realistic feeling of what coming out of their first back handspring is like, so I like to introduce this drill early even if we are just starting to put back handsprings on the beam.

For more drills and exercises to create strong, confident, technically correct beam workers look here:
Building Up Beam: Drills to Build Confidence and Correctness

Train hard!

Connecting beam series

Photo Credit: Erin Costa